National Diabetes Awareness Month: Q&A with Jasmine Amerasekera

Like with a lot of things, you were patiently waiting for it to be over… when we told you it wasn’t going to end, you just took it quietly.

Jasmine Amerasekera

As National Diabetes Awareness Month comes to an end, I wanted to share a Q&A from a diabuddy of mine.

Jasmine Amerasekera and I went to the same school (Parish Episcopal School in Dallas, Texas) our entire lives and while I’m 3 years older, I remember casually seeing her in the nurse’s office giving herself insulin before lunch periods or treating a low with juice boxes; not knowing of her T1D diagnosis at the time.

Jasmine reached out to me recently after reading my bio in our alma mater’s newspaper and was surprised to find out I was diagnosed with type one diabetes in college. She was excited to see a fellow alum/diabetic in the community after so many years of feeling alone during her time at Parish.

Jasmine’s story is your reminder that diabetes is not a one-size-fits-all. Read her diagnosis story and how she chose to tackle T1D both as a young child and an adult. She also shares great tips for when you are feeling defeated and burned out.

1. What do you remember from the day of your T1D diagnosis? 

Some of my earliest memories are from my diagnosis, but they are mostly in short, very vivid snippets. I was about one month shy of my third birthday. I remember being very ill in the days leading up to my diagnosis, especially on Halloween when I had dressed up as a bride but was too sick to leave my bed to even say hi to the other neighborhood kids when they came to the door. I remember the hospital very well, it was the Children’s Hospital in Dallas. There was a working model train in the lobby that my parents would take me to see once I was well enough to walk around a bit. I remember receiving visitors in my hospital room and some of them brought gifts that I kept for a very long time and even some I still have. I loved inviting people to sit down on the bed next to me and then pushing the buttons to move the whole thing up and down when they tried. I was only there for 3 days, after which they sent us home with a couple of Rufus and Ruby teddy bears from the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation and a few picture books for educating children and basically said good luck. 

2. What was your first reaction when you found out? 

I don’t remember much of this myself, but I think I was probably not very understanding of just how much this would impact my life and how different it would be from then on. I asked my parents if they remember and this is what my dad replied: “You didn’t really know what it was, but knew that you were ill. About a couple of months later you asked us when you would be well again and not need to take medication, etc. Like with a lot of things, you were patiently waiting for it to be over… when we told you it wasn’t going to end, you just took it quietly. I think you felt like you got an answer and that was sufficient at the time. But you definitely decided that you did not want to go back to the hospital. You made a promise with Caroline [Mitchell, my classmate at Parish and best friend] about that if I remember.”

3. What resources have been of help to you? 

I had a great set of pediatric endocrinologists growing up, who were very helpful and empathetic. In adulthood, I’ve turned to social media, Twitter especially, where there is a large and vocal community of all types of diabetics who are quite helpful with questions about lifestyle, insurance, the healthcare system, access to supplies, etc. My greatest resource in my life has always been other people with type one diabetes, and I find that our community is always very eager to help each other out in any way that we can.

4. Any advice you have for new diabetics? 

Find other type one diabetics. Diabetes can be hard to navigate alone, both from an emotional aspect and logistical one. Organizations like the JDRF or the ADA will sometimes have conferences and summits, sometimes free or not very expensive, and if you can attend something like that you definitely should go to meet other people who can understand what you’re going through. If you’re a kid or a parent with a diabetic child, look into what summer camps for type one diabetics might be available to you, they even have day camps for kids who aren’t ready to go to a sleepaway camp. These places are also great resources for more information about type one diabetes, since their keystone is always their educational component. Make sure that your friends, teachers, coworkers and other people around you are educated on your disease so that they can both be more supportive and empathetic and also so that they can react in an emergency situation, and get yourself a medical alert necklace or bracelet. I’d also like to emphasize that everyone is different. What works for some T1Ds might not work for others, so don’t feel like you have to follow the crowd when it comes to lifestyle or technology choices. Whatever gives you the best control over your life and let’s you feel the healthiest—do that. 

5. How do you manage diabetes with every day life? 

I make sure to be really open with the people around me about what I need. If I don’t feel well or need to step out of a meeting or class or any situation to take care of a low blood sugar, I explain why T1D is contributing to that. I also try to be really kind to myself. Our blood sugars can be affected by almost anything—food, stress, hormonal changes, exercise, the weather—and it doesn’t make sense to beat ourselves up when our blood sugars and control are really composites of all of these factors plus a thousand tiny decisions we don’t even know we’re making all the time. It can be easy to try and point out one thing you did and blame yourself for making that mistake, but make sure that it is constructive and empathetic feedback in the context of your life, not harsh and unforgiving criticism. I once heard from an endo of mine that there are no “bad” numbers, only data. I try my best to remember this, and that makes managing every day stuff seem a lot less daunting. 

6. What devices do you wear? Are there any other products you use that make living with T1D easier? 

I use a Tandem T:Slim insulin pump with the Dexcom G6 CGM sensor. In all the years I’ve had diabetes, the single thing that has made living with T1D easier has been the closed loop system. I was never able to get my A1c below a 7.0 until the closed loop system, and it also helps me sleep at night knowing that if my blood sugar starts to drop it will wake me up. 

7. Explain how it was to manage diabetes in college. 

I won’t lie, I had a difficult start with managing my diabetes in college. I was still taking injections and despite having had diabetes for years at this point was struggling with social anxiety around it, probably due to being in a new place where people weren’t aware of my T1D as they’d been at the school I’d gone to for my whole life. Luckily, I found out pretty early that T1D counts as a disability under the Americans with Disabilities Act and I was able to receive accommodations from the university because of that. That meant that if my blood sugar went really high and I had to miss a class or a test I was more easily able to explain this to my professors and TAs, and even if they didn’t understand what I was going through they had to accept it because I was protected by my accommodations. I also had accommodations during exams so that I could bring in juice and snacks and check my blood sugar as needed and even get extra time to do these things. After a pretty rough year and a half of really unstable blood sugars, I decided that the multiple daily injections were not working for me and switched to the insulin pump, which really helped a lot. Now I could be more discrete about taking my insulin, which meant I was more likely to take it when I needed it and not wait until I was alone. It was definitely much harder to handle diabetes in college than when I was a kid and had my parents to help me with everything, but it was an important step in my transition to adulthood. Learning to be a diabetic on my own had to come sooner or later, and college provided the catalyst for  that—it was a steep learning curve but in the end I knew a lot more about my T1D and myself. 

8. How has your support system been of help to you as you navigate the highs and lows of T1D? 

I am lucky to have a wonderful support system. My parents have always been my biggest advocates and a huge resource to me—they’ve always done their best to take some of the burden of T1D off my hands, and they’re always staying up to date with diabetes news and technology. They have spent many sleepless nights with me when my blood sugar was going low in the middle of the night. They educated my teachers and classmates at school so I never needed to worry. They have been very involved in the community and organizations with other parents and people with diabetes, asking for and giving advice based on their experiences. When I need help deciding between doctors or insurance plans or insulin pumps, they’ve done the research with me. And those are only just a few examples! I also have a boyfriend who I have been with for almost 7 years who has been a lifeline to me in adulthood. He took it upon himself right from the start to educate himself on type one diabetes and learned how to count carbs, the differences between recognizing and treating high and low blood sugars, and also understanding the emotional weight of T1D so that he can support me without me needing to explain myself. I don’t even know how I would navigate the highs and lows of T1D without my support system.

9. Does it ever get easier? Are you used to it by now?

I’ve seen both the technology and the rhetoric around T1D improve drastically throughout my life. Unfortunately, there are still a lot of issues around accessibility to this technology and even just the basic need of insulin for us. But it is really heartening to see more people talking about it and more awareness being granted to our struggles. As far as the day-to-day living with diabetes, it definitely gets easier—for example, carb counting is almost second nature to me. I no longer struggle with social anxiety around diabetes, fortified by the community on social media that has fully propelled us into the continuing body positivity movement. I think humans are really resilient, and as long as we have the right tools we can rise to so many difficult challenges. 

10. Are you a part of any diabetes organizations? Participated in any walks, raised money, etc. 

I used to be quite active in a couple of organizations. I did the JDRF Walk to Cure Diabetes (now called the OneWalk) every year as a kid and got all my friends to join me. My family used to raise upwards of $10,000 some years thanks to donations from some amazing friends and family members. I also volunteered as a counselor and nurse’s assistant for a camp that the North Dallas chapter of the American Diabetes Association put on called Camp New Horizons after attending it myself as a child. I personally am not super active in any large organizations anymore, participating more often in mutual aid efforts online for people who are struggling to access their supplies and insulin, but my mom is still a very active volunteer in JDRF especially, as a mentor to newly diagnosed families and others.

12. When is your diaversary?

November 4th, 1998. It complements Diabetes Awareness Month perfectly! I just celebrated 23 years since my diagnosis. 


I want to thank Jasmine for allowing me to share her story!

Just because NDAM is over, our constant battle of living with type one diabetes never ends- T1D is a full time job with zero PTO.

As Jasmine explained, what works for some T1Ds might not work for others, so don’t feel like you have to follow the crowd and compare yourselves when it comes to lifestyle or technology choices.

There are days where we are just plain tired of it all and days where we feel like we can conquer the world. It’s important to surround yourself with a community who is not only educated but who supports you throughout your daily highs and lows.

Let’s celebrate eachother today and every day because we’ve made it this far.  

Happy National Diabetes Awareness Month! 💙

I had a 2 pound Fibroid removed!

I had 4 uterine fibroids removed on Monday, September 20. My gynecologist, Dr. Tiffany Jackson (Baylor Scott & White- Plano, Texas) was able to perform a robot-assisted laparoscopic myomectomy which is a minimally invasive surgery leaving me with small incisions on my stomach.

After a successful surgery, Dr. Jackson came into my room to go over home care and told me one of my fibroids weighed 2 POUNDS!!! She said and I quote, “It was heavy! It’s like you gave birth to a premature baby.”

What are fibroids?

Fibroids are non-cancerous tumors in the uterus. Fibroids can develop inside, outside or on the surface of your uterus.

Black women are up to 3x more likely to develop fibroids more often than women of other races, and can have more severe symptoms.

I had no idea about this shocking statistic until speaking with my doctor!

Come to find out, my mom had her fibroids removed after giving birth to me and my brother. Both surgeries didn’t affect her pregnancies and made it to full term.

My Symptoms:

  • Prolonged menstrual periods- I didn’t know when my period started and stopped. Doctor visits were fun because when they asked “When was the last start date of your period?” I had no idea.
  • Pelvic pressure or pain
  • Enlarged stomach- I truly felt bloated and LARGE. I was carrying around 2-3 lbs of unwanted weight.
  • Pain during sex- Fibroids + Newlyweds = No bueno
  • Lower back pain
  • Frequent urination- It was almost reminiscent of when I was first diagnosed with T1D.
  • Constipation

I was told that my stomach looked like I was 5 months pregnant.

I’ve been carrying around this extra weight for more than a year and there I was thinking it was the COVID- Quarantine 15! I wasn’t seeing results from my Chloe Ting home workouts and recent Zumba classes, my energy levels were at an all time low, my sex drive was non-existent, I was bloated all the time and I could feel the cantaloupe sized fibroid in my stomach. I had back and pelvic pain for so long and thought it had to do with my newly inserted Kyleena IUD (this is me self-diagnosing myself) and had it removed back in March.

That didn’t fix anything.

Pre-Surgery Prep:

In one ear I’m being told by my endocrinologist that I need to workout more to improve my overall health and well-being to get my A1C down and in the other ear I have my gynecologist telling me I have 4-5 fibroids that have grown significantly in the past 2 years and that I will feel discomfort in my daily life.

*My interpretation* Your fibroids are hindering you from becoming your best self. These fibroids are the reason diabetes was dictating my life. I couldn’t be active like I was accustomed to which meant my diabetes management was being controlled by 4 balls of growth in my uterus… great.

On top of these fibroids, I had to remind myself that I also have an auto immune disease called Type One Diabetes, which comes with its own ups and downs.

Let’s just say I haven’t been the nicest person lately and my husband has shown me nothing but grace and patience.

Throughout all of last year, I had pelvic exams, blood draws, and numerous doctor visits with both my endocrinologist and gynecologist gearing up for this surgery.

Doctor visit number 9. But who’s counting?

After 2 canceled surgery appointments in July and August, due to my diabetes being out of range, I really had to buckle down and focus on getting my levels back in range. Both my endocrinologist and gynecologist wouldn’t give me clearance until this happened. It felt like they didn’t want me to be great but looking back I’m thankful they cared so much because I had a successful surgery and the healing process is going well so far.

Day of Surgery:

My surgery was scheduled for 7:30am (first surgery of the day) because I’m type one and I couldn’t eat or drink anything from midnight the night before until after my surgery.

The night before the surgery, I was monitoring my blood sugar on my Dexcom and I was pretty much in range all day Sunday. I had my last meal around 8pm and as we approached midnight, I was in range but almost “too normal”. My BG was 80 mg/dL at 11pm and I was like this can go one of two ways… I might go low during the night, which would mean I would have to eat or drink something AFTER midnight. So, I had a juice box and patiently waited for my sugar to elevate before I closed my eyes. I was around 114 mg/dL at midnight. 😴

I woke up at 4:15am to shower once more with the prescribed antibacterial soap (Hibiclens) and my blood glucose was sitting high at 224 mg/dL, so I corrected it. I was way more comfortable going into surgery higher than lower because it’s easier to treat a high (giving more insulin) than it is a low because I couldn’t have anything in my system at this time.

My endocronologist, nutritionist, and I had a plan pre- and post-surgery. Everything was going as planned until it wasn’t.

We arrived at the hospital at 5:30am for check in and my sugar would not go down! I started to lowkey freak out because my gynecologist wanted me below 200 mg/dL going into surgery. I kept correcting and correcting and my levels wouldn’t budge.

Fast forward 2 hours and it was surgery time! I was getting prepped by the nurses and they took my glucose and it was sitting at 214 mg/dL *still not understanding why my body is not following doctor’s orders!

My anesthesiologist, Dr. Webb came in the room and we went over the process, had me sign some papers, and identified where my insulin pump and sensor were located on my body. I put both devices on the back of my arms out of the way of my stomach area. He proceeded to remind me to run my temp basil which I was hesitant to do now (even though that was the plan during surgery) considering my BG was already on the higher side and I had insulin on board. He said he would rather have me in the low 200’s during surgery with a temp basil running than in range with the potential of going low. I was honestly impressed by Dr. Webb’s knowledge of T1D. I set my temp basil to 40% decrease for a duration of 4 hours.

It was go time!!

Post-Surgery Recovery:

It took 24 hours for my glucose levels to return back in range.

I had one of the highest daily streaks of great in range blood sugars I’ve had in a while.

*I’m starting to think that my fibroids were affecting my glucose levels… 🤔

It wasn’t until this surgery that I realized how much we use our stomach muscles on a daily basis. I can’t cough, sit up, sit down, use the restroom, dance, sneeze, and most importantly laugh without it hurting.

I had my first car ride 5 days post-op. See why this was a not so good idea on my Instagram post!

It’s important to vocalize any pain you may be feeling and seek the necessary help you need. After I was done self-diagnosing myself and making random appointments with all types of doctors, I simply told my gynecologist how I was feeling and we went from there. The pelvic ultrasound showed clear as day all of my uterine fibroids. They grew twice in size over the last year! I knew I wasn’t going crazy.

Since having the surgery, every day I feel like I’m getting stronger as I’m slowly weaning myself off the pain medications. Even though I walk slowly slumped over, don’t enjoy car rides, hold on to the sheets to get in and out of bed, and can’t seem to grasp the concept of placing a pillow over my stomach to cough, I remind myself how far I’ve come in one week!

The healing process is definitely a test for my patience.

To stay in the loop on post-surgery updates, follow me on Instagram @livingdiabetter.

If you have a fibroids story I would love to hear from you or if you have any questions for me, comment below!

A big shoutout and THANK YOU to my doctors and nurses. You all made this process and day very comfortable for me.

Dr. Heidi Shea- Endocrine Associates of Plano

Dr. Tiffany Jackson- Baylor Scott & White Gynecology Specialists

Dr. Jerry Lee Webb- Anesthesiologist, Baylor Scott & White Medical Center- Plano

Stacy Koenig- Pre Op Team, Baylor Scott & White Medical Center- Plano

Robin Hanks- Charge Nurse, Baylor Scott & White Medical Center- Plano

Robin Jacks- Guest Services, Baylor Scott & White Medical Center- Plano

Nurse Naomi- Baylor Scott & White Medical Center- Plano

Nurse Angie- Baylor Scott & White Medical Center- Plano

Nurse Terrie- Baylor Scott & White Medical Center- Plano

KEDZ Covers™ Review

When Katrina reached out to me after seeing my feature on Lauren’s Hope, I knew I had to help share her story and mission. She is the proud creator and founder of KEDZ Covers™, a flourishing small business that sells polypropylene plastic, colorful and reusable covers for the Omnipod insulin pump. Being diagnosed with T1D at the age of 9, Katrina quickly switched from needles to the Omnipod and Dexcom G6. She felt embarrassed about the way the Omnipod looked, so with her creativity and the help of her dad, KEDZ Covers™ was born! They partnered with an engineering company to create 3D printed prototypes for an Invention Convention which later grew into a business. KEDZ Covers™ has been featured in publications like the Boston Business Journal, Diabetes Forecast and Diabetes Mine.

After hearing Katrina’s story, I was excited to try out her KEDZ Covers™. The moment I unpackaged my cover, I was impressed by the overall look and feel of it. It’s made from polypropylene plastic which is flexible and lightweight. The plastic won’t break when snapping the cover on and off, which means these bad boys are durable and will last you a long time. It was easy to attach to my Omnipod and I removed it when it was time to change my pod, so I wouldn’t accidentally take my Omnipod off with the cover. It is recommended that the cover be attached to the pod once the pod has adhered to the skin and the cannula has been inserted. You can view demonstration videos here.

I wore my KEDZ Covers™ to the gym as I went through an entire HIIT cardio circuit without it falling off or interfering with my clothes. This is a trusted product that I will continue to wear and support. I can’t wait for all of my upcoming summer vacations so I can wear these colorful and reusable covers to match my outfits!

 

To rock your very own KEDZ Covers™, click here! You won’t be disappointed.

Katrina is such a strong young lady who continues to find the positive in what is a difficult disease to manage day-to-day. She inspires me to keep my head up and to keep spreading awareness for the type one community. Continue reading my full interview with Katrina below.

Katrina Diel’s Q&A

1. Tell me your T1D story after your diagnosis at age 9.

Once I was diagnosed, I immediately was put on long-acting and short-acting injections. After a few months of extreme highs, my endo decided it would be a good time for me to switch to a pump. I chose the Omnipod because it’s tubeless, waterproof, and best fit my lifestyle. I dance, play the violin, and go to the beach a lot in the summer so it was the best option for me. About a year later I was still experiencing blood sugars ranging from 20-400, and my endo introduced the idea of a CGM. Having a Dexcom has changed my life because it’s made management so much easier. I remember the first time I got it; I kept looking at the number to watch it change because I couldn’t believe that technology was capable of doing what my Dexcom was doing.

2. What was your first reaction when you found out?

Honestly, I didn’t really have much of a first reaction! At the time, I didn’t quite understand what everything meant until it started requiring carb counting, shots, more doctor appointments, etc. I learned to just adapt it to my current lifestyle and make do with the circumstances.

3. What complications have you experienced?

I’ve developed insulin resistance, making daily control challenging. I also have other chronic autoimmune disorders that make managing my numbers more difficult.

4. What resources have been of help to you? (Blogs, social media, nutritionists, endocrinologists?)

My family and I attended the Children With Diabetes Friends For Life Conference in Orlando, Florida about a year after I was diagnosed. It’s a week-long program where T1D’s have the chance to meet other T1D’s, and caregivers can attend informational classes regarding management, research, awareness, etc. You can learn more about meters, pumps, CGM’s, meal planning, pump trials, and more! It was there I met 3 T1D girls from different places across the U.S., who I still keep in contact with every day by text. They have offered me so much support, whether it’s advice, low carb recipes, or even just making me laugh on days that my diabetes doesn’t treat me so great.

5. Any advice you have for new diabetics?

You know your body best! It’s important to know when to trust your own opinions over others because after all, it is YOUR diabetes. Sometimes we set unrealistic expectations based off of things we hear or see from the lives of other diabetics/social media. But everybody’s body is different! Even though it may seem as if every other type one diabetic has perfect numbers 24/7, they’re not! It’s important to maintain balance, and remember there will be good days and bad days.

6. What’s your go-to when you’re experiencing lows?

Gummies if I’m trending down with IOB, and either a Capri Sun or Glacier Freeze Gatorade when super low!

7. Does having diabetes and being a high school student make it tough at times? (school dances, lunchtime, curious students, tests)

Definitely! My entire schooling experience with diabetes has been about navigating the rocky waters, and remembering that not everyone will understand because they don’t have the disease. I’m always open to educating others because I believe the more curious people are, the better because it raises awareness and creates less stigma. Most recently, my parents and I had to apply for accommodations during standardized testing for college applications, which can be a very tedious process. I think the more people who are made aware of the difference between type one and type two, the more they will understand they are two entirely different diseases.

In high school particularly, everybody is just starting to figure out who they are and find their own voice and sometimes diabetes can clash with that. As much as I want to go to a sleepover or have a smoothie at the mall with my friends, I have to remember there are some things I just can’t do because of my own personal health. For me, that’s often hard to come to grips with, but it’s helped me figure out who my true friends are. The ones that don’t mind sitting out with you while you drink a juice at a school dance with low blood sugar, or are willing to eat at a different restaurant you can enjoy something at, or who even help you tape up a site falling off at the pool, are the ones who you know will be by your side through thick and thin.

8. What does “living diabetter” mean to you?

I think “living diabetter” is about living a lifestyle where you don’t let your diabetes dictate every single one of your choices. Managing can be very exhausting, and it’s important to reward yourself with that ice cream sundae or an extra bowl of pasta and meatballs, but it’s also important to take care of yourself and try to stay active and maintain an overall healthy lifestyle.

9. How do you balance dancing and diabetes?

I think for me it’s about knowing there will be times I can control my diabetes and times I cannot. I usually try to keep water and Gatorade in the studio with me so that I can stay hydrated and have easy access to juice if I notice my BG trending down from my workout or a previous bolus. I wear my Apple Watch for every class since my Dexcom connects to it, allowing me to keep an eye on my trends with a quick glance. Usually, if I’m low I take a few sips of juice and keep up with dance class, but if my blood sugar reaches below 65 or above 300 I usually sit out because at that point it isn’t safe for me to continue. It’s often hard because I just want to continue on with class and improve my technique but I have to sometimes stop and listen to what my body is telling me.

10. Are you apart of any diabetes organizations? Participated in any walks, raised money?

I’ve participated in JDRF walks in both Providence, RI and Tampa, FL with family and friends. My family and I were the ambassador family for Omnipod at the 2014 CWD FFL conference. We sat in the Omnipod booth and answered questions from families, talked to other reps, and represented the entire Omnipod team. It was such a rewarding experience! I’ve also been featured in the Boston Business Journal, Diabetes Forecast, Rhode Island Monthly, the Rhode Island Patch, and more. Having those interviews gave me the opportunity to raise awareness of this disease.

14. How did you come up with KEDZ Covers™? What’s the story behind your company?

When I was in the 5th grade my class was required to come up with an invention for my school’s annual Invention Convention. Having been disappointed and somewhat embarrassed of the plain, white looking outside of my Omnipod, I put my thinking cap on, trying to figure out what I could do to change its boring appearance. I made a small cover to fit over my site with clay, and spray painted it. With the help of my dad, we took my model to somebody who created a scale drawing, and then later printed a 3D design made out of polypropylene plastic. We later had covers manufactured in 4 colors, and KEDZ Covers™ was created. “KEDZ” stands for my full name: Katrina Elisabeth Diel.

15. Anything else you would like to add/comment on.

Just a little thing I try to remember when I’m having a bad day: We always move forward. Tomorrow is a new day, and we can’t go backward and change the past. What we can do, however, is take the life we have been given and make the best of every single second we have.

MediPeds®: Let Your Feet Do the Talking

 

For those of you living with type one or type two diabetes, you should be taking extra care of your feet. Did you know? Diabetes can cause nerve damage that takes away the feeling in your feet. Diabetes can also reduce blood flow to the feet, making it harder to heal an injury or infection.

I know, I know… another unchecked box you probably have never thought of before, but we have to add this to our list. In order to avoid the serious complications mentioned above, keep your blood sugars under control!

I partnered with MediPeds® to help raise awareness on promoting healthy feet. MediPeds® socks focus on improving leg fatigue, swelling, blisters, and dry skin, which are symptoms caused by diabetes.

Although I have never experienced nerve damage or neuropathy, I have gotten blisters from wearing small shoes and high heels. Ladies, we’re all guilty of squishing our feet to fit in those cute pumps because they were the only size left on the shelf (I mean… one size too small won’t hurt, right?!) They may look good on your feet, but as soon as you take them off, you’re feet get to talking. They feel like they’re on fire and about to fall off. I can’t be the only one here! 🙋🏽

I admit that I choose cute and stylish over comfortability, but living with type one diabetes, I have to balance the two and listen to my feet. After a hard workout at the gym, my feet are sweaty and need to air out. I ‘m mindful of that, and immediately take my socks and shoes off when I get home. During date nights and GNO’s, I wear my wedges or heels, but the next day I wear comfortable shoes so my feet can recover. The same at the office, I  switch off between heels and fashionable sneakers. I have to pay close attention to what my feet are telling me so they can remain healthy.

I have been wearing my MediPeds® socks this whole summer and I am LOVING them! They seriously feel like I’m walking on clouds. Read how cool this is…the socks have COOLMAX® fibers that keep your feet dry and allow breathability during your active lifestyles. I wanted to test this feature out so I went to the gym, I wore MediPeds® on one foot and a generic sock brand on the other. After 60 minutes of HIIT cardio and upper body, I checked my socks and the generic sock brand was damp and the MediPeds® sock was dry! Y’all being the sweaty person I am, I have never experienced dry feet after working out. It was a miracle! 🙌🏾

Another cool feature is their non-binding top which is designed to improve blood circulation in the feet and legs. You know how after a long day, your feet feel tired and sore? Well, I put the low cut MediPeds® socks on and I immediately felt a soothing sensation. These socks feel like cotton balls surrounding my feet. ☁

The cushioned sole is another one of my favorite features because it helps keep my feet warm. I’m anemic and my feet and hands stay cold. I can wear the socks to bed and the extra padding warms them up without them feeling sweaty or clammy.

Please join me on the journey to healthy and happy feet by following these simple steps:

1. Inspect your feet daily. Check for cuts, blisters, redness, or swelling.

2. Moisturize your feet daily.

3. Pedicures, please! It’s okay to live your best life. 💅🏽

4. Always wear clean, dry socks. 🧦

5. Get periodic foot exams by your physician or endocrinologist. 👣

6. Buy you a pair of MediPeds® to help with this process.

MediPeds® are made specifically for a person with diabetes, circulatory problems, and someone who enjoys relaxing at home.

Here are my thoughts on the products I’ve tried:

• Style No. 8617 – MediPeds 3PP White NanoGlide Liner – I wear these liners with my converse and flats to work. They have a no-slip feature on the heels so they don’t fall down and have you walking on folded socks by the end of the day.

• Style No. 8587 – MediPeds 4PP White COOLMAX Wide Crew– These are my favorite socks! They keep my feet cool, dry, and comfortable. They fit perfectly on my feet without feeling smushed or claustrophobic.

• Style No. 1000 – MediPeds 4PP White XS Low Cut– I like to wear the low cut socks to the gym because they hug my feet perfectly but at the same time allow my feet to breathe.

• Style No. 1000 – MediPeds 4PP Black XS Low Cut- The low cut also stretches as I move. For example, after running on the treadmill, normally my socks get stuck in between my toes and I feel them scrunch up in my shoe. Wearing the low cut sock allows my feet to stretch and move around with comfort. The toe seam reduces pressure points. It’s pretty much like a built-in massage for your feet.

I would recommend people with diabetes and other medical conditions to add MediPeds® to their sock drawers. It’s like these socks can predict how your feet will feel and prevent it from happening. After a long night, I can trust my COOLMAX wide crew to repair my fatigued feet.

Take care of your diabetes. Keep your BG’s under control. Your soles will thank me later! 👟 👠

Find your perfect pair here: http://www.medipeds.com

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Q&A with Matt Collins, Co-Founder of SizeSlim Supplements

Video courtesy of SizeSlimTV

1. Tell me your T1D story when you were diagnosed in 1997.

I was diagnosed during my freshman year in high school in 1997. I was the JV football quarterback, and during a game, my mom noticed how thin I looked. She mentioned to a friend of hers (who happened to be a physician) all of my symptoms. I was exhibiting the classic symptoms: weight loss, blurry vision, sweet-smelling breath, etc. The physician/mom’s friend told my mom in a very stern voice: “after the game go directly to the drug store. Buy Keto-Diastix and use them. If they turn color head straight to the ER. I’ll call them and let them know you’re coming.” Sure enough, they turned dark brown. Next thing I knew I was the first name at the top of the ER chart with a blood sugar reading of 680mg/dl! The doctors at the hospital said I was so lucky someone was there to recognize the symptoms…otherwise, I may not have made it through the night.

2. What was your first reaction when you found out?

I was bummed out for sure. I had a lot of things going for me, and I remember thinking “but I was so close to having everything lined up perfectly…why me?” Luckily I have an amazingly supportive group of friends and family who helped me take on a somewhat competitive spirit with diabetes and always helped me move in the right direction.

3. What complications have you experienced?

None so far. I’ve been extremely diligent with my routines…for 20 years. I’ve never had to deal with any complications thus far, thank God.

4. What resources have been of help to you?

For me, the number #1 resource is technology. The more information I can get about my blood sugars throughout the day, the easier it is for me to maintain quality sugar levels for extended periods of time. This and the online diabetic community has been extremely helpful.

5. Any advice you have for new diabetics?

My advice is to never be ashamed of your condition. It is what it is, and unfortunately, there’s nothing we can do (at the moment) to cure it. But, it’s really important that you know this “hard lesson” as well. This condition is NOT your fault. But it IS your responsibility. Take it day by day. Learn something new every day. And, have an open mind about new technologies, techniques, or tricks to help you along the way. Success does not happen overnight. It happens by learning from your failures and utilizing all of your resources.

6. What’s your go-to meal?

Breakfast: 2 eggs with avocado toast 🙂 Lunch: Chicken and salad. Dinner: Sashimi…I could eat raw fish every day of the week.

7. How do you manage diabetes with your active lifestyle?

I manage my situation by staying 1 step ahead of every low and every high. That means being prepared at all times with insulin, CGM’s, food, and meters. No matter what, we always have to stay 1 step ahead of whatever activity comes throughout the day. For Example, big meeting at 1:00pm? Check, correct, and fix BG’s no later than 12:30pm.

8. What devices do you have?

I use the Dexcom G5 CGM (love it) connected to my iPhone which connects to my Apple Watch…this is a home run combination. Makes my life sooooo easy 🙂 I also use insulin pens – Dexcom and Apidra.

9. You find yourself “low” when…

If I over bolus for a meal. I will get immediately frustrated for no apparent reason. I’ll look down at my watch and sure enough, I’ll be dropping and on my way to being low.

10. You find yourself “high” when…

If I don’t workout throughout the week and am super stressed, I’ll for sure run a bit high. I find myself aggravated very easily. Basically, I’ll go from Dr. Jekyll to Mr. Jackass. LOL.

11. What does “living diabetter” mean to you?

It means giving myself every fighting chance to live a “normal” life. I would LOVE to know what it’s like to have perfect sugars for an entire year. We’re not quite there, but living diabetter is me finding my way to living the best life possible given my t1d situation.

12. Does it ever get easier? Are you used to it?

Oh, yeah! 100%. With all of the new technology and resources we have, t1d is 10,000 times easier than when I was in high school or college. Did I get used to it? I suppose so. It’s a way of life now. Still a pain sometimes. But I’m not ashamed, nor do I care what other people think about me. For others it’s probably harder to get used to. For us, it has to be 2nd nature.

13. Are you apart of any diabetes organizations?

Yes, indeed! I’m involved with JDRF. These guys are GREAT! I’ve actually been invited to be a guest speaker at the largest JDRF event which is on May 12 in Oakland County, Michigan. I’m looking forward to seeing everyone there! Also, I’m proud to say that my company (SizeSlim Supplements) donates 1% of our sales to JDRF each year. More information can be found on our website at www.sizeslim.com.

14. Anything else you would like to add.

Please feel free to reach out with any particular questions you have about T1D. I can best be found on Instagram at @matt_t1d. I want to give a big thanks to Amshi at Living Diabetter for all of the work she does. I think this resource should be used by all T1Ds as a means to learn more from each other.

Remember: together we are MUCH stronger than dealing with this alone.

Low Carb Coke Float

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‘Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house

A diabetic sat craving, something sweet for Mr. Claus.

The fridge and pantry were empty and bare

In hopes that Saint Nick would put healthy goodies there.

While she sat and pondered what could she possibly make

No flour or sugar, cookies for Santa were going to be impossible to bake.

But with a blink of an eye and a wish on a star

Two magical ingredients appeared on the bar.

She in her onesie and coke float in hand

Taking sips of the tasty dessert that was not planned.

As she left one for Santa and checked her BG ‘fore bed

A sound echoed in the chimney and down came someone in red.

Saint Nicholas answered all of her wishes

and filled up the fridge and pantry with low carb dishes.

He gulped down the coke float and flew out of sight

MERRY CHRISTMAS TO ALL, AND TO ALL A GOOD-NIGHT!

Keto Friendly Coke Float Recipe

2 ingredients:

1/4 cup Heavy Whipping Cream

1 3/4 Cup of Diet Soda

Do-It-Yourself:

  1. Pour the Heaving Whipping Cream into your glass of choice.
  2. Slowly pour your favorite diet soda into the glass.
  3. Enjoy!

For the holidays or a little kick add Vanilla Crown Royal to the mix! It pairs great with my diet soda of choice, Vanilla Coke or regular Coca-Cola.

(Please drink responsibly)

Thank you Hey Keto Mama for the delicious recipe!

Follow all of her Keto friendly recipes on Pinterest.

Dear Diabetes, Thank You.

6th Diaversary!

Today marks my 6th year living with type one diabetes. As I reflect on how much type one has played a major role in my life and how much it’s impacted me, I’m forever grateful God has chosen me to take on this challenge. Instead of writing about how much I hate being a diabetic and how inconvenient it can be at times, I would like to celebrate my 6th diaversary with a personal thank you note to Diabetes.

Dear Diabetes,

You can’t control me. After putting up with you for 6 years, I feel like we have a special bond and an understanding that I can tell you anything. Now what I’m going to say next may shock you, but I would like to take this time to say thank you.

Thank you for being there 24/7 and never leaving my side even when I wanted to take a break from you. The late nights and early mornings never get old… because we’re bonding right? Knowing I can count on you to wake me up at 3:00am with a welcoming sweaty pillow, makes it all worthwhile. We spend more time together than I do with my fiance and family. We have formed a special bond no one can break, not even my endocrinologist, dietician or doctor.

Remember when you thought you were going to take control of me 6 years ago? I was a freshman in college, running to the bathroom 15-20 times a day, drinking a 24-pack of water that lasted every 2 days, feeling burned out during volleyball practice more frequently, and not knowing what was going on with me.

Well, guess what? I kept going because that’s the only thing I knew how to do. My athlete instinct kicked in and I pushed through the weird experiences I was going through. I blamed my 10-pound weight loss on the tough workouts and the constant urination on all the Gatorade and water I was consuming. I made excuses for something I didn’t know I had for 3 months.

No more excuses. After my diagnosis, you changed my life forever and I have accepted it. I have accepted the challenge.

I thought I was the healthiest I could be at 18 years old, but you fooled me. I am now more aware of what goes into my body. I can look at any type of food and automatically tell you how many carbs it has. I can tell you that Mexican food and pizza will raise my blood sugar 2 hours after I eat because it’s a higher carb meal. With carb loaded meals like those, I know to extend my bolus on my Omnipod to prevent bedtime highs. This has become second nature. Now at 24 years old, I’m the healthiest I’ve been with a 6.7% a1c. So I thank you.

You had me think I was in the best shape of my life, but you constantly remind me that I have to workout daily to keep my numbers in a normal range. But you have to make things difficult. I have to run a temp basal and monitor my numbers throughout my workout to prevent lows because having lows suck. Lows suck especially at the gym when you’re killing leg day and all of a sudden the squat rack feels 20 times heavier. You have to stop in between reps and go to the locker room to squeeze a juice box down your throat hoping you don’t pass out. You’re already sweating from being there an hour so you don’t know you’re THAT low until the room looks blurry, your walk becomes wobbly and your hands are shaky. Besides that Diabetes, you’ve held me accountable and made sure I stay in the best shape of my life.

I could really strangle you and curse your name for how expensive your supplies are, but I won’t. Instead, I’ll rearrange my entire budget and bite my tongue because I have to live. I’m very fortunate to be able to afford your expensiveness… test strips, insulin bottles, Omnipods, alcohol wipes, back up insulin injection needles, glucometers, ketone sticks, blood glucose meters, and batteries. At least you’ve provided me with a temporary survival kit until you are no more. So on that note, I say thank you.

Thank you for showing me how strong I truly am. When you decide to play those funny games in the early mornings, I get you under control and find myself up 3 hours later continuing my normal routine. It’s like I have 2 jobs, one that I get paid for, the other, well… I pay you. Thank you for teaching me that my appearance does not matter. All of the finger pricks, site changes and bruises that appear on my body, are constant reminders of you. I am greater than my highs and lows. I am not my disease. I am capable of the impossible. All because of you. I will not let you win. I’m a type one diabetic showing my gratitude for everything you’ve taught me about myself and with that, I say thank you.

After 6 years of our ups and downs, I can honestly say I’ve had enough and I pray for the day you are gone out of my life for good.

But until that day comes, I will continue inspiring others to push through their struggles and educate those who are unfamiliar with how cruel you really are. Even on my bad days, I will try to look for the positive. I have come too far to throw in the towel now. So on this day, after reflecting on how you’ve changed my life for the good (mostly bad), I’ve come to the conclusion that you can’t control me… you never will.

Yours truly.

 

Diabetes Month Q&A

As we wrap up Diabetes Awareness Month, I’ll be featuring stories of fellow type one diabetics. Today, I’m sharing with you a Q&A interview I had with Parker Nunes.

Parker Nunes was recently diagnosed with type one diabetes on June 22, 2017. His diagnosis story intrigued me so I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to dive in deeper. Parker is from Massachusetts and is currently a college student. After graduating with a degree in Landscape Design, Parker plans to attend nursing school. Read how Parker chooses to live diabetter!

Q: Tell me your diagnosis story.

A: I was diagnosed with type one diabetes a month before my nineteenth birthday. Every morning I woke up with the inside of my mouth and throat completely dried out. I was drinking about four to six gallons of beverages a day and using the bathroom about twenty-five times a day. I thought the many bathroom breaks were due to me drinking more frequently so it didn’t alarm me. One night, I knew something was wrong because, in my sleep, my legs locked up making me feel paralyzed, unable to move without feeling sharp pains. The pain went away after an hour or so and I went back to sleep. That morning, I went to work and I started feeling the same pain. I immediately went to my physician’s office to do a routine check-up; everything came back clear except for two things. My sugar level was extremely high, with an a1c of 12.6 and large ketones. This day forever changed my life.

Q: What was your first reaction when you found out?

A: Once the physician’s assistant told me what the diagnosis was my heart literally dropped to my stomach. After nearly having a heart attack my physician contacted my father and told him what was going on. He was very surprised too. After getting off the phone with my father he called my mother and she had a very hard time understanding why this was all happening.

Q: How has it been adjusting to your new lifestyle?

A: Adjusting to diabetes was hard at first. As time passed, it got a little easier to manage but still difficult.

Q: How does type one interfere with sports?

A: When playing sports like hockey and golf it is difficult. Hockey is more difficult because I can’t wear my pump when playing. I have to disconnect the pump and load up on a bunch of carbs so I can keep my levels even throughout the entirety of the activity.

Q: What resources have been of help to you?

A: I always talk to my regular physician, four endocrinologists I see at Baystate, and my nurse I see about anything diabetic related. I’m surrounded by my helpful resources.

Q: Any advice you have for new diabetics?

A: For any new diabetics of any age, I would say watch what you eat for the first month or so to see how you adapt to your diabetes and insulin/ carb ratio. At nineteen years old, I joined the gym to keep up with exercise and to maintain a healthy weight. Insulin does have an effect on your body, you just have to get used to the changes. Whenever I’m at home or somewhere and in public, I normally keep my bag full of supplies with me and of course food.

Q: What’s your go-to meal?

A: Who doesn’t love food? My go-to is beef/bacon jerky. My all-time favorite snack is low in carbs and it’s very accessible anywhere you go.

Q: How do you manage diabetes in everyday life?

A: Managing diabetes in my everyday life can be difficult at times. When I first started on pens it was more of a hassle than it was with the pump.

Q: What devices do you have?

A: I have the Tandem Slim X2. I will be getting the Dexcom G5 continuous blood sugar monitor. The CGM reads your sugar level every five minutes to let you know how you are doing. If you have a pump without a CGM I would consider looking into it.

Q: What does “living diabetter” mean to you?

A: Living diabetter means being conscious of what I eat and being aware of my numbers, but still finding that balance. I still love my sweets 🙂

New Partnership with LifeSeasons LLC

Okay… so I know I told you I had some exciting news to share with you. Well, here it is… *drumroll please* I partnered with LifeSeasons, a natural supplements company in Dallas, Texas. LifeSeasons creates natural formulas targeted toward specific everyday health concerns. I’m so excited to be given the opportunity to share with you my 90-day journey with the following all-natural supplements:

Mobili-T 

Rest-ZZZ

Glucose Stabili-T

Living with type one diabetes, it’s difficult to find supplements and/or medications that don’t interfere with your blood glucose levels. For example, I can’t take Tylenol because it raises my blood sugar drastically. Well, guess what? LifeSeasons is a healthy substitute which doesn’t affect your blood sugars! It makes it easy for you, blending all of the natural ingredients together in a safe formula. I knew I had to try these products out.

What it is:

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Mobili-T assists in the free movement of the joints and assists in moisturizing them to help support ease and range of motion. I’m a retired college volleyball athlete and I have accepted the fact that my joints and muscles will forever ache. I recently injured my shoulder, which has limited my range of motion. Depending on the day, the pain creeps up on me; so bad that I can’t sleep on it, put on clothes, or even shower. Any slight movement can be unbearable. With my luck, I also sprained my ankle recently in an alumni volleyball game, and now I’m experiencing stiffness and more pain. So basically, EVERYTHING HURTS!!! I will use Mobili-T twice a day (as suggested) as a daily Ibuprofen replacement.

Rest-ZZZ aids in relieving muscle tension, restlessness, and nerve-related sleeplessness. It helps calm the nervous system and promotes natural sleep cycles. Being the millennial I am, I work a 9-5 job with a few side hustles; life is tiring! My mind races at night and I’m constantly making to-do lists for myself. I’m grateful to try Rest-ZZZ to ease my racing mind and restless nights. Everyone deserves a great night sleep, right?

Glucose Stabili-T helps maintain healthy blood sugar, circulation, and vision. It also supports the body’s natural cellular metabolism. I will use Glucose Stabili-T to help with circulation and vision. Diabetics have to get frequent eye and foot exams. If you’re not in control of your diabetes, it can affect your eyes and feet the most. Eyes- Having high levels of sugar in your blood for a long period of time can harm the tiny blood vessels in your eyes. This can result in vision problems or even blindness. Feet- Diabetes can damage your body’s nerves. Nerve damage stops you from feeling pain or other problems in your feet. Poor blood circulation can also cause damage to your feet. A lack of blood flow can slow down the healing process for a sore or infection. IMPORTANT: Ladies and gentlemen, before getting a pedicure, make sure everything is sanitary! Watch the pedicurist clean the bowls and utensils before they touch your feet.

Mobili-T Ingredients: Glucosamine, Chicken Collagen, MSM (methylsulfonylmethane), Chondroitin Sulfate, Turmeric Root Extract, Bromelain

Rest-ZZZ Ingredients: Chamomile, GABA, Melatonin, Passion Flower, Valerian Root

Glucose Stabili-T Ingredients: Alpha Lipoic Acid, Bilberry, Chromium, Cinnamon, Gymnema

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LifeSeasons conveniently ships the products directly to your home. If you sign up for the monthly subscription, not only do you save 15% on all of your orders, but you get FREE shipping! If online shopping is not for you, go to your local Whole Foods or Sprouts. LifeSeasons is found on the shelves of many health stores. Find a store nearest you Store Locator.

To find the supplements that are formulated for you, visit Formulas to Help You Rebalance.

I will share my experiences with you as I continue this journey to a healthy lifestyle.

For more information on these fabulous products, click HERE.

#FormulatedforLife

Life Seasons Logo

Coping with the Highs and Lows of Dating a Diabetic

Living with diabetes is difficult enough, from meal planning, carb counting to finger pricks and site changes. When you add the “Big D” to the mix of everyday life, it can cause a relationship to either grow stronger or fall apart. These extra challenges that are involved with the lifestyle of a diabetic are better when faced together. “In sickness and in health until death do us part” isn’t just a memorized vow you say at the altar, it has a deeper meaning to us diabetics. It means when shit gets hard, you will be there every step of the way. When we become shaky, fatigued and sweaty, will you hand us our favorite candy (yummy glucose tablets) or juice box? How about when we’re cranky and argue for no reason? Will you be the first to apologize and tell us to check our numbers for a high? When we are burned out and don’t feel like diabetes-ing today, will you step in and take over our numbers or cook a low carb meal? When the going gets tough, will you run or accept the challenges of this new lifestyle and face it together?

I reached out for some first-hand experiences and tips on dating a diabetic, and the responses came rolling in. I found them very valuable and have shared them with my valentine of 6 years, and now, with you.

“My husband knows a box of chocolates is just asking for disaster, because if there’s chocolate in the house, I will find it and then eat every piece! Flowers are always a sweet gesture, and I won’t snack on those!” – Ang, @sickoftheprick

“My boyfriend and I were together prior to my diagnosis, which was back in November. I always had so much energy prior! Then things started to go downhill. I felt so awful and tired all the time, so much that one day I stopped at his house on my way home from class so I could nap, and then continue on home.
When I got the diagnosis I felt so calm, as if I had already accepted it. I think at that point I was just glad that I knew why I felt awful. Though, that’s when my boyfriend kinda freaked out about it. Every time I ate, we would go on long walks to bring my blood sugar down, and when I wanted ice cream, he literally read all the nutritional facts on all the ice creams at Kroger until he found one with the lowest amount of carbs. Even when I bought him a cake for his birthday, it was obvious that the thought of me eating a slice worried him. He didn’t quite grasp that I could just use insulin. At that point, he had also done research, which of course revealed all the terrible effects that T1D can have on the body.
Now, I’m the one freaking out. It’s like it has finally hit me that I’m going to be battling this the rest of my life. Luckily, my boyfriend is the calm one now. I cry a lot more, and he just holds me. I have a Dexcom G5, so whenever my phone makes a noise, he checks to make sure it’s not my blood sugar. He knows how to use my glucometer, knows how to work my insulin pen, and he knows what to do if I’m high or low. For me, I sometimes don’t even feel a low, but when I do, he can tell. I also never feel highs unless I’m hitting 500.
He has truly made this process so much easier for me, and I couldn’t imagine what it would have been like had I not had such a supportive person by my side through this. As long as a person cares about you, your diabetes won’t matter. If anything, this experience has made our relationship stronger.” – Rachel Reedy

“My hubby said that he’ll remind me to check my bgl if my movements are slow and/or my speech is slurry. I know he has asked me to check them if I’m cranky and I try to listen without being defensive, where possible! When I initially started on insulin, my hubby learned to carb count with me, and I have to say that I relied on him a lot as I was having trouble remembering things at the time. We go for walks together on the weekend, and he happily changes his pace for my interval walks. He was originally impatient when we went on long road trips, but now makes stops patiently if I need to make frequent toilet or water stops when my bgl is up. We mainly eat healthy, and my hubby has learned to try to keep junk food out of sight. He has also slowly learned not to tell me what to eat! It has been a hard road, and we still struggle with it sometimes, but we’re getting better at it all the time.” – Pauline Cunningham

“We have been together almost 24 years, and I was diagnosed about four years ago. He has been awesome. He knows when I am low, and he knows to be patient when I am high and crabby. He wakes me up in the middle of the night to check my sugar if my sensor is not working. He tries to eat as close to me as possible aside from some ice cream and heath bars when he is dying for sugar. He helps remind me to make sure I have all my supplies on me. In return, I have helped him with his sobriety and this year we were both diagnosed ADHD, so we have been through hell together and are stronger because of it.” – Kelly N Jeff

“We have been together 4.5 years, and I was diagnosed just 2.5 years ago. He’s been great at adjusting! Before I got my Dexcom, he would just magically know I was low when I had no idea. He reminds me to take my insulin even when I’m having a rough day and don’t want to and will do pump changes for me if I’m being lazy about it. We are still working on learning that if I start getting mean when high to remember it’s the sugar talking, not me!” – Alexandra Marie Raxter

“I have been with my husband for 6 years. I was diabetic when we first met. It took him a while to get his head around it all, but he’s my rock. Now, he will always take interest in my sugars and remind me to take them if I am unwell. He does it for me at times. He’s good at recognizing symptoms of highs and lows, and he’s been there for every hospital admission, and I would be lost without him.” – Stacey McAinsh

It does’t end here. If you want to give your valentine a shoutout or share some experiences you’ve encountered, please comment below.
Happy Valentine’s Day!
XXXX
P.S. splurge the day away, just don’t forget to bolus 🙂